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Utilising creativity to help your well-being by Dawn Lindson

Updated: Jul 8, 2021


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Creativity is a form of self-care, with many positive benefits for our well-being, helping us to live a healthier and a longer life. Human beings have needed to have the drive to create, innovate and explore for basic survival and being able to adapt to new things, develop ourselves and thrive.



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For optimum wellbeing, we all need to find a method of self care that we enjoy, bringing us increased energy and happiness. If we are able to have a creative interest that challenges us and brings us more fulfilment in life, then we feel more motivated to include it in our every day routine. Whether your creative outlet is drawing, singing, sewing, music, dancing, writing, baking or gardening, it is a positive way to channel your thoughts and energy. It provides a sense of achievement and pride, which are the building blocks for your self-esteem and confidence, this can then boost our resilience levels.





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Being in the moment whilst being creative leads to better problem solving, reducedstress levels, stops rumination, increases self acceptance and is the gateway to flow. We know we are in a state of flow when we are fully focused and absorbed in a creative task, we become distracted from ourselves, others, what is happening around us and loose awareness of time. Our attention is only on what we are creating, and making sure we achieve something positive, beautiful and meaningful. We don’t havespace for worrying thoughts and so happens to be a great way to escape the not so good things that may be happening in our everydaylives.


Having your own creative interest helps developa positive self identity. Those who have suffered from anxiety, depression and trauma have found creative expression healing. Activities such as writing,painting or drawing can enable people to express or manage theiremotions in a positive and productive way. This can include helpingpeople to express their goals, or experiences that may be too difficult toput into words, having a beneficial impact on their mental health. Writing about an emotional topic lowers cortisol levels and helps to reduce negative thoughts and emotions. It can also give a different perspective on an issue. Drawing, painting or sculpting are especially helpful ways to use imagery for people to process and express traumatic events in situations where it is difficult to communicate them verbally. Drawing and doodling helps us to achieve that moment of flow, which boosts our mood and slows our heart rate down. Music calms neural activity, which helps to decrease anxiety and restore emotional balance. Whereas movement-based creative expression can help you to de-stress.


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